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THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS (ACP) SPECIAL REPORT ON LIVING WITH HYPERTENSION (544k pdf)

HOW DOES HIGH/LOW BLOOD PRESSURE ARISE?

Each time your nurse or physician takes your blood pressure, they are recording two measurements: your SYSTOLIC pressure and your DIASTOLIC pressure. Your SYSTOLIC pressure (the first and highest number) is the pressure or force the heart places on the walls of your blood vessels as it is working/pumping with each heartbeat. DIASTOLIC pressure (the second and lowest number) is the lowest pressure the blood places on the walls of your blood vessels when the heart is relaxed between beats.

Both of these measurements are important. A high systolic pressure indicates strain on the blood vessels when the heart is attempting to pump blood into your bloodstream. If your diastolic pressure is high, it means that your blood vessels have little chance to relax between heartbeats.

Occasional high blood pressure is common. Anxiety, exercise, or nervousness can cause you to have a high reading. Untreated sustained high blood pressure can increase your risk of premature strokes and heart attacks.

There are some factors, over which you have no control (e.g. age, heredity), that can increase the chance of having high blood pressure. However, there are some factors over which you can have control:
  • Lose weight, if necessary
  • Avoid fatty and salty foods
  • Give-up smoking
  • Restrict your caffeine and alcohol consumption
  • Exercise regularly, but sensibly

Q & A ABOUT OUR BLOOD PRESSURE PRODUCTS:

» Q & A about our blood pressure products
» Q & A about blood pressure
» Q & A about the measurement
» Q & A about the software


Q & A ABOUT OUR BLOOD PRESSURE PRODUCTS
  1. Can I connect any cuff as long as it fits to the connection port?
  2. Is a manual monitor as accurate as an automatic device?
  3. Can I wash the cuff?
  4. I already have an AC/DC adapter at home, can I use it or do I need the MICROLIFE adapter?
  5. My MICROLIFE blood pressure monitor pumps up but does not release the air, what is wrong?
  6. What is the meaning of the different messages "Err1", "Err3", etc.?
  7. Why and when should I send the device in for an accuracy check?
  8. How do I know if the device is still accurate after long usage or after being dropped?
  9. Is a wrist device advisable for self-measurement?

Q & A ABOUT OUR BLOOD PRESSURE
  1. Are there unsuitable sporting activities if you have high blood pressure?
  2. The medication has led to a potency disorder. What can I do?
  3. Will I have to take "blood pressure reducing medication" for a long time?
  4. Can I stop taking medication when I feel relaxed?
  5. Can I stop taking medication at the weekend or on holiday?
  6. Can I stop taking medication due to side effects?
  7. Are side effects to be expected with drug treatment?
  8. Is it possible for my blood pressure to drop too low due to treatment?
  9. Does blood pressure depend on the age?
  10. What is 'White Coat Hypertension'?
  11. I understand that blood pressure varies over the day and I get different results, accordingly. But how high is my blood pressure really, then?
  12. What can be done, if regular increased/low values are obtained?
  13. Which values are normal?
  14. How does high/low blood-pressure arise?

Q & A ABOUT THE MEASUREMENT
  1. Can the MICROLIFE blood pressure monitor be used in a driving ambulance, an aeroplane or train?
  2. Can I use my MICROLIFE blood pressure monitor also at low pressure levels such as in the high mountains?
  3. I have to control the pulse rate of my cardiac pacemaker very accurately. Can I use the pulse result of the MICROLIFE blood pressure monitor for this?
  4. I want to check my level of fitness with a MICROLIFE blood pressure monitor but during activity the device always displays an error message. Why can I only measure under quiet conditions?
  5. Do I have to place the cuff at upper arm exclusively or can I put it at other places such as forearm or leg?
  6. What happens if I do not place the wrist cuff at heart level?
  7. On which side should I generally measure my blood pressure, left or right?
  8. Under which conditions can I get the best possible measurement results?
  9. How long should I wait between measurements?
  10. What should be considered when doing self-measurement?
  11. Is it true that blood pressure is mainly measured with the “oscillometric” technique? What does this mean?

Q & A ABOUT THE SOFTWARE

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